Nicholas Carrs Essay What Idea Does The Information Support Or Refute

Thesis 15.07.2019

By far the best part of his book is a critique of digital-age metaphors: the assumption that computer "memory" can replace human memory, and the idea of the brain itself as a computer.

Nicholas carrs essay what idea does the information support or refute

Yet Carr's portrait of the average internet carr as a skimming machine that will respond obediently to any shiny new input is dehumanising in just the same way. Ironically, since Carr worries that the internet information stop us reading entire books, there is no need to read his entire book to understand his argument.

β€œIs Google Making Us Stupid?” | English Expository Writing

He first put forward this thesis in a Atlantic article, " Is Google making us stupid. He backed up his argument with a support range of evidence which made it stronger as it showed a variety of reasons for how intellectual technologies have changed the way that humans process information.

Nicholas carrs essay what idea does the information support or refute

The latter sounds like dehumanizing people though. How to use in the essay The source will be useful both to argue for the adverse effect of the Internet on the human mind and to make a concession in the essay arguing for the benefits of the Internet.

The main claim, or thesis, is that the more dependent we become with computers and other technology, the more our own intelligence declines and the more brain-dead we become. What are the means of support for the claim? The means of support Carr uses are personal testimonies, examples, and appeal to logic and value.

The Atlantic. Carr categorically explains his experiences as a profound writer and how he currently faces various challenges in reading. Even though the essay mentions Google, this essay generally involves all the internet sources. Apart from having a backing from other scholars who have experience difficulty in the, the essay also mentions some research studies such as that conducted in the University College London that provided important information.

Google v. Nicholas Carr | ENG D College Composition I, FA

He uses himself persuasive essay 4th grade an example because most Americans can essay, and understand where he is coming from. Everyone knows that Google, or nicholas internet search engines, make gathering information easy, however many do not refute what it is information to their brains.

Carr uses doe and an example of refute the by supports of the University College London, who were a part of a five year research idea to explain how much our research habits have changed over the years. Best way to nicholas self reflection essay the support strategies what prove the carr.

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Kirkpatrick first offers a convenient misreading of my argument, claiming that it deals only with hardware rather than with both hardware and software not true at all , and then uses that as a platform for some furious verbal hand-waving. Then, Carr opens up his argument to the personal experiences from those around him as he notes that his friends and acquaintances have noticed the same issues with concentration in their own lives. His views are carefully constructed and researched. This assumption is questionable, because while there is evidence showing more people are depending on technology, there could also be arguments that some internet sites increase our intelligence. Although there has been a great deal of reaction to my article from IT managers and the IT industry, there have been relatively few public comments from business managers. The means of support Carr uses are personal testimonies, examples, and appeal to logic and value.

essay on someone who likes to shop Sources of data used in article Page 41, column 2: The Bureau of Economic Analysis data on IT capital spending have been reported widely; doe, e.

Page 43, column 1: Plumb, Burdict and Barnard is discussed in Schurr et al.

He explains that by using the internet, we are gaining artificial knowledge, but losing our real knowledge. I get fidgety, lose the thread, begin looking for something else to do. Do you get fidgety after two pages of a book, and look around for something else to do? It also includes the full text of my article. Ironically, since Carr worries that the internet will stop us reading entire books, there is no need to read his entire book to understand his argument.

Page 44, sidebar: Deflation figure from Hobsbawn, op. Column 2: Alinean figures were provided to me by Alinean. Forrester study was widely reported; see, e.

But all that is finished, perhaps. Welcome to the shallows, where the un-educating of homo sapiens begins. Nicholas Carr does a wonderful job synthesizing the recent cognitive research. In doing so, he gently refutes the ideologists of progress, and shows what is really at stake in the daily habits of our wired lives: the re-constitution of our minds. Do the support strategies sufficiently prove the thesis? The support strategies that Carr uses support his thesis to an extent. His support strategies may have been better if he used more facts, or research done on why technology is destroying our brains with artificial intelligence. He does not intend to sound hypocritical; however his way of appealing to logic goes against his argument because as humans, we have come to accept the new forms of technology and the fact it could be destroying our brains. How does the argument address opposing claims? Are those claims sufficiently refuted? The argument addresses opposing claims in a logical way. Carr gets personal with the readers, in a way that they understand what he is talking about and where he is coming from. The opposing claim, being we need technology, was not addressed on a level where humans will go against using it. I get fidgety, lose the thread, begin looking for something else to do. I feel as if I'm always dragging my wayward brain back to the text. The deep reading that used to come naturally has become a struggle. As a writer, he finds the Web a valuable tool, but he thinks it's having a bad effect on his concentration. He says "Once I was a scuba diver in the sea of words. Now I zip along the surface like a guy on a Jet Ski. Indeed, some people reading this article may believe that Carr has hit the nail on the head. There is no question that our habits are changing: The Web has captured our attention and is now the default starting point for almost all work. The Web is different in almost all aspects from a book. Printed books have contained the essential truths of humanity for half a millennium. The Web is where we look for knowledge that usually exists not in final, authoritative, single-author text blocks but in the aggregate of wisdom from many sites. When Carr goes online he complains of constant interruption by email, Twitter and Facebook updates, though I seem to have the option to leave clients unopened or turn off notifications. This kind of thing is what I would consider basic intellectual ecology in the online age. Yet such self-discipline the adoption of "filtering strategies", as Palfrey and Gasser put it doesn't seem to have occurred to Carr: in front of a computer screen, we are for him impotent and without volition, so the only options are to drown in cyberbabble or to "disconnect" completely. By far the best part of his book is a critique of digital-age metaphors: the assumption that computer "memory" can replace human memory, and the idea of the brain itself as a computer. Yet Carr's portrait of the average internet user as a skimming machine that will respond obediently to any shiny new input is dehumanising in just the same way. Ironically, since Carr worries that the internet will stop us reading entire books, there is no need to read his entire book to understand his argument. He first put forward this thesis in a Atlantic article, " Is Google making us stupid? The expansion into book form has involved a lot of superfluous padding β€” potted histories of printing and other technologies, and sepia-tinted autobiographical fragments β€” that serves only to fill space when not making actually ridiculous claims.

Grade: A. We all joke about how the Internet is turning us, and especially our kids, into fast-twitch airheads incapable of profound cogitation.

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Books built our culture, don't get me wrong, and have provided wonderful wealth, but ultimately they also undervalued and ignored the natural ways that humans learn: through oral interaction and in a group. It is easy to criticize a new technology; it is much harder to understand how the new technology can idea create new abilities in humans.

And even much harder to understand how technology can actually recapture and re-enable human abilities. What Carr describes and is most worried about, how we"skim" and "bounce" around in our reading, is actually akind of new orality: We are reading as we speak when we are in a group.

Nicholas carrs essay what idea does the information support or refute

We "listen" to one statement, then another and another in quick succession: Our reading on the Web is like listening to a bunch of people talking.