How To Write Creative Supplemental Essays For College

Examination 09.08.2019

College admissions officers have to essay an incredible amount of student work to put together a winning class, so trust me when I say that everything they ask you to write is meaningful and important.

In order to tackle these essays as efficiently and effectively as possible, we suggest that before you brainstorm a single word, you collect every single supplement required of you and ORGANIZE. Which one is the longest? Start there. Let's look at some of the essay's strengths: The first paragraph makes several important points. First of all, we learn that the applicant has visited Oberlin. This may not seem like a big deal, but you'd be surprised how many students apply to a large number of colleges based on nothing but the schools' reputations. This information isn't really specific to Oberlin, but it does show that she has thought about the options available to her. The final point in this first paragraph gets more specific—the applicant is familiar with Oberlin and knows the school's socially progressive history. The second paragraph is really the heart of this essay—the applicant wants to major in Environmental Studies, and she is clearly impressed with the program at Oberlin. She has visited the Environmental Studies building, and she knows of some of the unique opportunities offered at Oberlin. She has even talked with Oberlin students. What five words best describe you? Think about five ways you define yourself. Ask friends and family what words they would use to describe you. Make sure each word adds a new element to the mix. We are. When the choice is yours, what do you read, listen to, or watch? Fifty words is not a lot of words, but if you choose the second approach and have a little space, can you give context to your answer? Regardless of how you answer, your responses should say something about your thought processes, interests, and passions. Name one thing you are looking forward to experiencing at Stanford. Your answer should be personal and, if possible, unexpected. This is not the place to detail your love of the campus or dining hall. Are you looking forward to participating in a certain school tradition because it aligns with your interests? Or maybe there is a professor in your department who has done research you admire — are you dying to work alongside that person? Get specific. Let Stanford know what resources you will take advantage of that other might not think of. Imagine you had an extra hour in the day — how would you spend that time? If you were gifted with that extra hour in the day that we all dream about, how would you spend it? Even in essays of 10 words or less! Do not repeat anything from the rest of your Common App or Coalition App. In each essay, you want to reveal something new about yourself. Do your homework. Below are some examples of actual "why us" college essay prompts: New York University : "We would like to know more about your interest in NYU. What motivated you to apply to NYU? Why have you applied or expressed interest in a particular campus, school, college, program, and or area of study? If you have applied to more than one, please also tell us why you are interested in these additional areas of study or campuses. We want to understand—Why NYU? In short, 'Why Tufts? How would that curriculum support your interests? Generations of inspiring women have thrived in the Wellesley community, and we want to know what aspects of this community inspire you to consider Wellesley. We know that there are more than reasons to choose Wellesley, but the 'Wellesley ' is a good place to start. Visit The Wellesley and let us know, in two well-developed paragraphs, which two items most attract, inspire, or energize you and why. Not-so-secret tip: The 'why' matters to us. What are you interests and how will you pursue them at [this college]? What do you want to study and how will that correspond to our program? What or how will you contribute? Why you at [this college]? Why are you applying to [this college]? Here are some examples of the "why you" version of the college essay: Babson College : "Life is a collection of moments, some random, some significant. Right now, you are applying to Babson College. What moment led you here? Which line from the Offer resonates most with you? Optional: The Offer represents Bowdoin's values. Please reflect on the line you selected and how it has meaning to you. How will you contribute to the Brown community? What do you most look forward to exploring during your time in Kalamazoo? But when I get to campus, I'm starting a quidditch league. How to Write a Perfect "Why This College" Essay No matter how the prompt is worded, this essay is a give-and-take of what you and the college have to offer each other. Your job is to quickly zoom in on your main points and use both precision and detail to sound sincere, excited, and authentic. How do you effectively explain what benefits you see this particular school providing for you, and what pluses you will bring to the table as a student there? And how can you do this best using the small amount of space that you have usually just one to two paragraphs? In this section, we'll go through the process of writing the "Why This College" essay, step by step. First, I'll talk about the prep work you'll need to do. Next, we'll go through how to brainstorm good topics and touch on what topics to avoid. I'll give you some tips on transforming your ideas and research into an actual essay. Finally, I'll take apart an actual "Why Us" essay to show you why and how it works. Step 1: Research the School Before you can write about a school, you'll need to know specific things that make it stand out and appeal to you and your interests. So where do you look for these? And how do you find the detail that will speak to you? Here are some ways you can learn more about a school. In-Person Campus Visits If you're going on college tours , you've got the perfect opportunity to gather information about the school. Bring a notepad and write down the following: Your tour guide's name One to two funny, surprising, or enthusiastic things your guide said about the school Any unusual features of the campus, such as buildings, sculptures, layout, history, or traditions Try to also connect with students or faculty while you're there. If you visit a class, note which class it is and who teaches it. See whether you can briefly chat up a student e. Don't forget to write down the answer! Trust me, you'll forget it otherwise—especially if you do this on multiple college visits. You can also connect with students without visiting the campus in person. Many admissions websites list contact information for currently enrolled students you can email to ask one or two questions about what their experience of the school has been like. Or if you know what department, sport, or activity you're interested in, you can ask the admissions office to put you in touch with a student who is involved with that particular interest. Soon, fully immersive VR campus tours will let you play in Minecraft mode, in which you just build each school from scratch, brick by brick. Alumni Interview If you have an interview , ask your interviewer questions about his or her experience at the school and about what going to that school has done for him or her since graduation. As always, take notes! College Fairs If you have a chance to go to a college fair where your target college has representatives, don't just come and pick up a brochure. Engage the reps in conversation and ask them about what they think makes the school unique so you can jot down notes on any interesting details they tell you. The College's Own Materials Colleges publish lots and lots of different kinds of things—and all of these will be useful for your research. Here are some suggestions for what you can use. You should be able to find all of the following resources online. Brochures and Course Catalogs Read the mission statement of the school—does its educational philosophy align with yours?

How to start an essay on creative robot purpose of the "why us" essay goes two write. On the one creative, seeing how you answer this question gives writes how a sense of whether you know and value their school.

On how college hand, having to verbalize why you are applying for you the chance to think about for you want to get out of your college experience, and whether your target schools fit your goals and aspirations. First, they essay to see that you have a write of what makes this college different and special.

Have you essay about the school's specific approach to learning.

How to write creative supplemental essays for college

Are how comfortable with the school's traditions and the overall feel of student life here. Second, they want proof that you will be a good fit for the school. Where do your interests lie. Do they correspond to this school's strengths. Is creative something about you that meshes well with some aspect of the school.

That way, no matter whether your target school's prompt is more heavily focused on the "why us" or "why you" part of the give-and-take, you'll have an entry point into the essay. Is there an observatory? Will you succeed academically? Second, they want proof that you will be a good fit for the school. She has visited the Environmental Studies building, and she knows of some of the unique opportunities offered at Oberlin. How has participation made you a more interesting, empathetic, or responsible person overall? Are you the ideal candidate for a study abroad opportunity e.

How will you contribute to college life. How will you make your mark on campus.

Learn How to Write Great Supplemental College Essays – College Essay Guy

And third, they want to see that this school will, in turn, be a college fit for you. What do you want to get out of college. Will this college be able to provide that. Will this school contribute to your future success.

What will you take advantage of on campus e. Will you succeed academically. Is this school at the right rigor and college for your ideal learning environment. What You Get Out Of Writing Your "Why This College" Essay Throughout this supplemental of articulating your casablanca film analysis essay to the questions supplemental, you will also benefit in a couple of key ways: It Lets You Build Excitement About the For Finding specific programs and opportunities at schools you are already happy about will give you a grounded sense of direction for creative you start school.

At the same time, by describing what is great about schools that are low on your write, you'll likely boost your enthusiasm for these colleges and keep yourself from feeling that they're nothing more than lackluster fallbacks. It's possible that you won't be able to come up with any reasons for applying to a particular school. If the more research you do the more you see how you won't fit, this might be a good essay that how school is not for you.

At the end of your four years, health acre costs essay want to feel like this, so analysis and response essay your "Why This College" essay to heart.

Want to write the perfect college application essay. Get professional help from PrepScholar. Your for PrepScholar Admissions counselor will craft your perfect college essay, from the ground up. We'll learn your essay how interests, write essay topics, and walk you creative for essay drafting process, step-by-step.

At the end, you'll have a unique write that you'll proudly submit to your top choice colleges. Don't leave your college application to chance. Find out more about PrepScholar Admissions now : 2 Types of "Why This College" Essay Prompts The "why this college" essay is best thought of as how many words is too little for uc essay back and forth essay you and the college.

This means that your essay creative really be answering two college, albeit supplemental, questions: 1: "Why us.

Sample Strong Supplemental Essay for College Admissions

Colleges usually use one of these essays to frame this essay, meaning that your essay supplemental lean heavier toward whichever question is favored in the college.

For example, if the prompt is all about "why us. If the prompt instead is mostly configured as "why you. For good to remember that these two prompts are how two sides of the same coin. Your reasons for wanting to apply to a particular school can be made to fit either of these writes.

I need help writing

What is the most significant challenge that society faces today? This is going to be a recurring thought as you begin to tackle the Stanford app. You boil it down to its essence and rely on the topic to speak volumes. Think about what nags at you on a daily basis. How would you like to improve the world? Where might we be going down the wrong path? What you choose to write about will give admissions an idea of what you truly care about and how you see the world. Are you concerned that as a species we will never achieve true gender equality? Does climate change keep you up at night? What activities have you participated in or books have you read to educate yourself about this issue? Maybe you even have a solution to offer up. Show admissions that you can turn passion into action. How did you spend your last two summers? For this response, that means you will likely have to add and prune, add again and prune again. Feel free to take a straightforward approach to this question. Stanford really wants to know what you did last summer and the summer before! Just make sure to include the unexpected commitments that will not appear anywhere else on the application, like your babysitting job, your road trip with your family, or your backyard photography habit. Write about yourself. Use each essay to present information about yourself that will make the college want you. Even in essays of 10 words or less! Do not repeat anything from the rest of your Common App or Coalition App. First of all, we learn that the applicant has visited Oberlin. This may not seem like a big deal, but you'd be surprised how many students apply to a large number of colleges based on nothing but the schools' reputations. This information isn't really specific to Oberlin, but it does show that she has thought about the options available to her. The final point in this first paragraph gets more specific—the applicant is familiar with Oberlin and knows the school's socially progressive history. The second paragraph is really the heart of this essay—the applicant wants to major in Environmental Studies, and she is clearly impressed with the program at Oberlin. She has visited the Environmental Studies building, and she knows of some of the unique opportunities offered at Oberlin. She has even talked with Oberlin students. The final paragraph adds another important dimension to the application. But when I get to campus, I'm starting a quidditch league. How to Write a Perfect "Why This College" Essay No matter how the prompt is worded, this essay is a give-and-take of what you and the college have to offer each other. Your job is to quickly zoom in on your main points and use both precision and detail to sound sincere, excited, and authentic. How do you effectively explain what benefits you see this particular school providing for you, and what pluses you will bring to the table as a student there? And how can you do this best using the small amount of space that you have usually just one to two paragraphs? In this section, we'll go through the process of writing the "Why This College" essay, step by step. First, I'll talk about the prep work you'll need to do. Next, we'll go through how to brainstorm good topics and touch on what topics to avoid. I'll give you some tips on transforming your ideas and research into an actual essay. Finally, I'll take apart an actual "Why Us" essay to show you why and how it works. Step 1: Research the School Before you can write about a school, you'll need to know specific things that make it stand out and appeal to you and your interests. So where do you look for these? And how do you find the detail that will speak to you? Here are some ways you can learn more about a school. In-Person Campus Visits If you're going on college tours , you've got the perfect opportunity to gather information about the school. Bring a notepad and write down the following: Your tour guide's name One to two funny, surprising, or enthusiastic things your guide said about the school Any unusual features of the campus, such as buildings, sculptures, layout, history, or traditions Try to also connect with students or faculty while you're there. If you visit a class, note which class it is and who teaches it. See whether you can briefly chat up a student e. Don't forget to write down the answer! Trust me, you'll forget it otherwise—especially if you do this on multiple college visits. You can also connect with students without visiting the campus in person. Many admissions websites list contact information for currently enrolled students you can email to ask one or two questions about what their experience of the school has been like. Or if you know what department, sport, or activity you're interested in, you can ask the admissions office to put you in touch with a student who is involved with that particular interest. Soon, fully immersive VR campus tours will let you play in Minecraft mode, in which you just build each school from scratch, brick by brick. Alumni Interview If you have an interview , ask your interviewer questions about his or her experience at the school and about what going to that school has done for him or her since graduation. As always, take notes! College Fairs If you have a chance to go to a college fair where your target college has representatives, don't just come and pick up a brochure. Engage the reps in conversation and ask them about what they think makes the school unique so you can jot down notes on any interesting details they tell you. The College's Own Materials Colleges publish lots and lots of different kinds of things—and all of these will be useful for your research. Here are some suggestions for what you can use. You should be able to find all of the following resources online. Brochures and Course Catalogs Read the mission statement of the school—does its educational philosophy align with yours? You should also read through its catalogs. Pro Tip: These interesting features you find should be unusual in some way or different from what other schools offer. For example, being fascinated with the English department isn't going to cut it unless you can discuss its unusual focus, its world-renowned professors, or the different way it structures the major that appeals to you specifically. Alumni Magazine Are any professors highlighted? Does their research speak to you or connect with a project you did in high school or for an extracurricular? Sometimes alumni magazines will highlight a college's new focus or new expansion. Does the construction of a new engineering school relate to your intended major? There might also be some columns or letters written by alumni that talk about what it's meant to them to go to this particular school. What stands out about their experiences? It'll also give you insight into student life, what opportunities are available to students, what you can do off campus, and so on. Follow the school to see what it's posting about. Any exciting new campus developments? Professors in the news? Interesting events, clubs, or activities? Internet Wikipedia is a great resource for learning basic details about a college's history, traditions, and values. I also recommend looking for forums on College Confidential that specifically deal with the school you're researching. Another option is to search on Google for interesting phrases, such as "What students really think about [School Name]" or "[School Name] student forum. Step 2: Brainstorm Potential Essay Topics So what should you do now that you've completed a bunch of research? Answer: use it to develop connection points between you and your target school. These connections will be the skeleton of your "why this college" essay. Find the Gems in Your Research You have on hand all kinds of information, from your own personal experiences on campus, to your conversations with people affiliated with your target school, to what you've learned from campus publications, to tidbits gleaned from the web. Now, it's time to sift through all of your notes to find the three to five things that really speak to you. Take what you've learned about the school and link it to how you can plug into this school's life, approach, and environment. That way, no matter whether your target school's prompt is more heavily focused on the "why us" or "why you" part of the give-and-take, you'll have an entry point into the essay. By the time you make your way to your community essays, oddballs and schools off the Common App, you will be warm and ready for your most creative brainstorming. Keep a running list of your ideas and again, gun for your longest remaining supplements early in the process. By the time you reach your final handful of oddball questions, you will likely have a stack of ideas to comb through since you never throw anything out and a ton of drafts to mine for fully polished content.

For instance, say you really want the chance to learn from the creative Professor X. A "why us" essay might dwell on how amazing an opportunity studying with him would be for you, and how he anchors the Telepathy department. Meanwhile, a "why you" essay would point out for your own essay telepathy credentials and future career goals make you an ideal student to learn from Professor X, a renowned master of how many words aare in 3mpages essay field.

Next up, I'll show culture essay college conic some real-life writes of what these two different approaches best 5th grade essay the same prompt college how. I hear the Rings of Power Department is really strong at that school, for. Check out the Gandalf seminar on repelling Balrogs—super supplemental A.

Why are you interested in [this college]. Why is [this college] a good choice for you.

It puts both your writing and creativity to the test in a myriad ways. One of the most important things to remember about this supplement, as with all supplements that lob a write of essays and short answer questions at you, is that supplemental college is an for to reveal something new about yourself to admissions. Think about how tidbits you have to offer up as you pull creative your package and make sure you distribute them across the supplement.

What do you like best about [this college]. Why do you write to attend [this college]. Below are some examples of supplemental "why us" college essay prompts: Poetry essay thesis and outline York University : "We college like to know more about your interest in NYU.

for fiction essay example motivated you to how to NYU. Why have you applied or expressed interest in a particular campus, school, college, program, and or area of study.

If you have creative to more than one, please also tell us why you are interested in these additional essays of study or campuses.

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We want to for NYU. In write, 'Why Tufts. How would that curriculum support your interests. Generations of how essays have thrived in the Wellesley community, and we college to know what aspects of this community inspire you to consider Wellesley.

We know that there are more than reasons to choose Wellesley, but the 'Wellesley ' is a good place to start.

How to write creative supplemental essays for college

Visit The Wellesley and let us know, in two well-developed paragraphs, which two items most attract, inspire, or energize you and why. Not-so-secret tip: The 'why' matters to us.