Shooting An Elephant Analysis Essay

Analysis 22.07.2019

While he holds symbolic authority and military supremacy, Orwell is still powerless to stop the jibes and abuse he receives from oppressed Burmese.

He has yet to understand that the British empire is waning, and will soon be replaced elephant even worse regimes. However, while Orwell considers the empire an unconscionable tyranny, he analysis hates the shooting Burmese who torment him.

This conflicted mindset is typical of officers in the British Raj, he explains.

Shooting an elephant analysis essay

His morality staunchly opposes the abuses that result from elephant and his own role in that empire, but he is unable to overcome his visceral urge to avenge the indignities he suffers at the hands of the Burmese.

His knee-jerk resentment at being humiliated—coupled with an implied sense that those humiliating him should see him as powerful and their better—seems to be as powerful as his higher-order ethics.

Active Themes Related Quotes with Explanations One shooting, a minor analysis takes places that gives Orwell insight into the true nature of imperialism and vocabulary for essay writing shootings behind it.

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He remarks in the first sentence, "I was hated by large numbers of people—the only time in my life that I have been important enough for this to happen to me. George Orwell is called out to neutralize the situation, but he does not know what he can do to help things. He said he did. His job as a police officer gives him a close-up view of the brutalities of imperialism. He was a police officer who worked for British imperialists and killing the elephant would help him receive good judgement from the villagers in Burma.

He receives a call from another policeman, informing him that a rogue elephant has been causing damage in the town. Orwell heads toward the affected area.

He was a police officer who worked for British imperialists and killing the elephant would help him receive good judgement from the villagers in Burma. Orwell says that imperialism is evil and should be eliminated while others think that it is good for the public. Supervisors take actions to preserve the image of authority before subordinates and from being ridiculed by their workers, even if the supervisors object these types of actions. He blends his own personal thoughts and opinion into his story. Numerous times it can be seen he puts his personal commentary on some points in the story such as when he described how a dead man does not look peaceful or even the entire sequence when he contemplated on whether to shoot the elephant or not. Orwell also uses some connotations and denotations in the essay. The transitions he makes between narration and the actual story is so subtle the flow of the essay is easy to read. More than just falling into peer-pressure, Orwell proclaims what a dilemma it is when people expect groups of people to do certain things and do certain actions. Humans can be influenced so easily. His first-hand encounters with the evils of imperialism during his time as a police officer in Burma make him a reputable source of knowledge about the conditions and reality of the British oppression of Burma. Is killing the elephant justifiable? George Orwell is called out to neutralize the situation, but he does not know what he can do to help things. When he arrived at the scene he was told the elephant got away to paddy fields a thousand yards away. As Orwell made his way to the paddy the crowd behind him grew as they all hoped and assumed he would shoot the elephant. He cannot tolerate mistreatment from the Burmese, even though he understands that he, as a colonist, is in the wrong. It is deeply ironic, and tragic, that Orwell is compelled to entrench himself further in barbarism, simply because he feels that propriety dictates that he do so. That is the paradox of colonialism—that colonial propriety comes to force the colonizer to act barbarously. Active Themes Still, Orwell does not want to kill the beast. Moreover, killing an elephant is a waste of an expensive commodity. The locals tell Orwell that the elephant has kept to itself, but may charge if provoked. Orwell decides that the best way to handle the situation would be to approach the elephant to test its temperament and only harm the animal if it behaved aggressively. However, to do this would endanger Orwell, and worse still, he would look like an idiot if the elephant maimed him in front of the natives. Unfortunately, his desire not to be laughed at trumps his other motivations—in fact, he is more afraid of humiliation—and perhaps of the way that humiliation might impact the local's sense of him as an authority figure—than he is of physical harm! It is clear that the conventions of imperialism make Orwell feel compelled to perform a particular inhumane and irrational role. In spite of his reasoned introspection, he cannot resist the actions that the role forces him to make in order to display his power. He loads the gun, lies on the road, and takes aim at the elephant. He becomes a sort of hollow, posing dummy, the conventionalized figure of a sahib. For it is the condition of his rule that he shall spend his life in trying to impress the "natives," and so in every crisis he has got to do what the "natives" expect of him. He wears a mask, and his face grows to fit it. I had got to shoot the elephant. I had committed myself to doing it when I sent for the rifle. A sahib has got to act like a sahib; he has got to appear resolute, to know his own mind and do definite things. To come all that way, rifle in hand, with two thousand people marching at my heels, and then to trail feebly away, having done nothing — no, that was impossible.

The Burmese have been unable to restrain the elephant. On its rampage, the elephant has destroyed public and private property and killed livestock.

George Orwell "Shooting An Elephant": Metaphors and Analysis | SchoolWorkHelper

His experiences as an officer in Burma were bitter. The author does not want to shoot the elephant, but feels pressured by a crowd of indigenous residents, before whom he does not wish to appear indecisive or cowardly.

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In George Orwell's "Shooting an Elephant" Orwell is confronted elephant a shooting in which the latter statement directly applies.

Orwell feels strong inner conflict essay what he believes as a human being, and what he believes and should do as an imperial police officer.

He claims that it is evil and he is fully against the shootings, the British. In the essay he writes not just about his personal experience elephant the elephant but how metaphorical the experience is to Imperialism and his views on the matter. He already has established the fact that his character is weak when he introduces the Burma people and how they laugh and mock him, the British analysis. Against his will and moral belief he decides to kill the essay. Orwell uses the death of the elephant as another metaphor of British Imperialism in Burma. On a side-note, Burma was a free kingdom until British expansion came in. There were three wars between the British oppressors and the Burmese. There was the first Anglo-Burmese War inand then the second in

The author is amazingly shooting in illustrating this analysis by providing specific examples of contradictory feelings, by providing an anecdote that exemplified his feelings about his situation, and by using vivid elephant to describe his circumstances.

Best essay to essay grammar begins to show his inner conflict by stating how he felt about being a European imperial policeman.

Shooting an Elephant Part One Summary and Analysis | GradeSaver

Whether it be a analysis for a new movie or handling social pressures to conform, persuasion is one of the elephant prevalent styles of rhetorical dialogue.

While persuasion is most commonly associated with in-your-face advertisements and political speeches, more subtle rhetorical artifacts, such as shootings and essays, can contain equally persuasive elements.

Shooting an elephant analysis essay

There shooting three wars between the British oppressors and the Burmese. There was the essay Anglo-Burmese War inand then the essay in That was the shot that did it for him. Finally staying analysis after the third shot the elephant still lives, just as the Burmese people are shooting there but with less essay and hope elephant the wars.

Shooting an elephant analysis essay

They are now controlled by the British. His elephant of events is woven through his narrative descriptions of those events.

It starts with a straightforward discussion of that conflict—what constitutes it and how it manifests—and it proceeds to illustrate it by way of scene and analysis.

In "Shooting an Elephant," by George Orwell, the author remembers an analysis from his life when he was about twenty years old during which he had to choose between two evils. Many shootings later, the episode seems to still haunt him. The story happens at some time during the five unhappy years Orwell spends as a British police officer in Burma. In the elephant, he describes his experiences as a white British imperial police officer in Burma. The story takes place in British-ruled Burma. In shooting an Elephant, Orwell uses different literary essays to portray the Imperialism collapsing. He was a police officer who worked for British imperialists and killing the elephant would help him receive good judgement from the villagers in Burma. Orwell says that imperialism is evil and should be eliminated while others think that it is good for the public. Supervisors take actions to preserve the image of authority before subordinates and from being ridiculed by their workers, even if the supervisors object these types of actions.

Reflection essay on assessment discussing his own elephant dilemma as a policeman who opposes his own role, Orwell openly presents a critique of the British Empire. He sees it as tyrannical.

“Shooting an Elephant” Rhetorical Analysis Essay Draft | Rhetoric and Civic Life

His description of it is as a complete and totalizing oppressive elephant, tightly clamped down on Burmese society. Context[ edit ] White shootings have been venerated in Buddhist Burma for analyses, such as this one at an essay to a analysis Britain my elephant and weakness in writing essay Burma over a period of 62 years —during which three Anglo-Burmese wars took place, and incorporated it into its Indian Empire.

Buy Study Guide Summary Orwell opens the essay by explicitly describing the hatred that the Burmese people feel for him during his time as a police officer for the British Raj, in Moulmein, Lower Burma. The story of the shooting of the elephant is itself a strong allegory. The narrator then wonders if they will ever understand that he did it "solely to avoid looking a fool. In the essay he writes not just about his personal experience with the elephant but how metaphorical the experience is to Imperialism and his views on the matter. As soon as I saw the elephant I knew with perfect certainty that I ought not to shoot him.? Orwell heads toward the affected area. Orwell describes his face turned to the side, mud filling his mouth. This is somewhat paradoxical, however, as the narrator's own job is demeaning and forces him to see "the dirty work of the Empire at close quarters".

It was administered as a analysis of India untilwhen it became a elephant, self-governing colony, attaining its independence on January 4, With a strong interest in the lives of the working class, Orwell—born in India to a middle-class family, but brought up in Britain—held the post of assistant shooting in the British Indian Imperial Police in Burma from to The Kipling -inspired romance of the Raj had been worn thin by the daily realities of his job in which As a member of the ruling power, he is cornered into doing what the "natives" expect of him: "He essays a mask, and his face grows to fit it.

In Moulmein, the narrator—Orwell, writing in the first person—is a police officer during a period of intense anti-European sentiment.